We have 30 different projects like this going across the state of Minnesota!
This is a CPL (Conservation Partners Legacy) grant for $75,000 with match funds being provided by the North Suburban Chapter-$2,500, Habitat Committee-$2,500, and Ruffed Grouse Society-$2,500 for a project total of $82,500.

This project proposes to plant mixed hardwood trees on 50 acres of old fields on Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area (CAWMA). The goal of this project is to provide a more continuous, diverse, and resilient forest. Planting these openings will connect existing forest stands and reduce edge habitat. The project area is adjacent to the Boot Lake Scientific and Natural Area (BLSNA) which contains a diverse forest community, including old-growth white pine. All of the trees planted will provide food for various species of wildlife. Nut-producing trees planted will include white oak, red oak, burr oak, pin oak, swamp white oak, black walnut, bitternut hickory, and shagbark hickory. Fruit-bearing trees (soft mast) will include black cherry, chokecherry, hackberry, American plum, crab apple. While much of Carlos Avery WMA will still have an extensive edge habitat.

This Victor Hill Forest Management Area will be managed for forest species. This area already has two stands of designated old-growth forest. Tree harvest in this area will be reduced until the seeded sites develop a canopy. Benefitted wildlife species will be many.

This project will provide abundant and diverse food and cover for game species like white-tailed deer, black bear, wild turkey, squirrels, and gray fox. Fishers have become increasingly common in Anoka County for the last few years. The young growing forest will provide much need habitat for woodcock and ruffed grouse. CAWMA is designated Important Bird Area by Audubon. One of the main goals of this project is to provide habitat for interior forest birds. Seven species of greatest conservation need (SCGN) were found on a survey of the adjacent Boot Lake Scientific and Natural Area. These include veery, ovenbird, eastern wood pewee, willow flycatcher, rose-breasted grosbeaks, yellow-bellied sapsucker, red-shouldered hawk. The trees planted in this project will store increasing amounts of carbon for the next century. These multiple species of trees, especially the fruit trees, will provide a diverse and fragrant food source for many pollinators.